Historic Views on Government – Bloom

Honest opinion about government from Allan Bloom:

Affirmative action now institutionalizes the worst aspects of separatism. The fact is…that the university degree of a black student is…tainted, and employers look on it with suspicion, or become guilty accomplices in the toleration of incompetence. The worst part of all this is that the black students, most of whom avidly support this system, hate its consequences. A disposition composed of equal parts of shame and resentment has settled on many black students who are beneficiaries of preferential treatment. They do not like the notion that whites are in the position to do them favors. They believe that everyone doubts their merit, their capacity for equal achievement. Their successes become questionable in their own eyes. Those who are good students fear that they are equated with those who are not, that their hard-won credentials are not credible. They are the victims of a stereotype, but one that has been chosen by black leadership. Those who are not good students, but have the same advantages as those who are, want to protect their position but are haunted by the sense of not deserving it….
   The Closing of the American Mind, 1987

Allan Bloom was co-director of the John M. Olin Center for Inquiry into the Theory and Practice of Democracy at the University of Chicago, where he was also a professor on the Committee of Social Thought. He taught at Yale, Cornell, the University of Toronto, and other universities and translated and edited Plato's Republic and Rousseau's Emile. Although he wrote numerous articles as well as Shakespeare's Politics (1964) and Confronting the Constitution (1990), he is best known for The Closing of the American Mind (1987), a sweeping analysis and critique of contemporary thought.

Quotation and short bio from The Quotable Conservative: The Giants of Conservatism on Liberty, Freedom, Individual Responsibility, and Traditional Values. Rod L. Evans and Irwin M. Berent, editors. Holbrook, Mass.: Adams Publishing, 1996.

Historic Views on Government – vos Savant

Honest opinion about government from Marilyn vos Savant:

In addition to buying votes, what's wrong with government doing the spending instead of our doing the spending ourselves? Consider this: When you spend your own money on yourself (such as buying yourself a tie or a handbag), you do an excellent job of keeping the cost down and getting exactly what you want. But when you spend your own money on someone else (such as buying a gift tie and handbag for your parents), you still keep the cost down, but you don't get them what they'd choose themselves. (Think about all the gifts you've ever received: What percentage of them would you have chosen yourself?)
Even worse, when you spend a third party's money on someone else, you not only don't get the recipient what he or she would choose, there's also no pressure to keep the cost under control. (Imagine being allowed to charge that gift tie and handbag to the "taxpayers" instead of to your own account: Would you worry about the cost?) This is what the government does, and in a massive way, every single day.
   "Ask Marilyn," Parade, Oct. 9, 1994

Marilyn vos Savant is listed in the Guinness Hall of Fame for having the highest officially measured IQ – 228. Her column, "Ask Marilyn," is featured weekly in Parade. She has written a number of books, including Ask Marilyn (1992), The World's Most Famous Math Problem (1993), and I've Forgotten Everything I Learned in School! (1994).

Quotation and short bio from The Quotable Conservative: The Giants of Conservatism on Liberty, Freedom, Individual Responsibility, and Traditional Values. Rod L. Evans and Irwin M. Berent, editors. Holbrook, Mass.: Adams Publishing, 1996.