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02/16/2001 - Difference Between Agents, Personal Managers, Entertainment Attorneys, Business Managers, and Public
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How To Produce Movies for Television


"People who soar are those who refuse to sit back, sigh and wish things would change. They neither complain of their lot nor passively dream of some distant ship coming in. Rather, they visualize in their minds that they are not quitters; they will not allow life's circumstances to push them down and hold them under."

-- Charles R. Swindoll

To achieve success in the entertainment industry, it's important to maintain a positive mental attitude. Visualizing your goals will help to set the wheels in motion. That's the first step. But don't stop there. Actualize your goals. This will bring you to the next plateau. It's critical to take action.

Nobody does it alone. We all need to work in concert with other professionals in order to fully realize our goals.

Many people are confused about representation and have asked us which is best: to be represented by an agent, personal manager, or an entertainment attorney.

The answer is that all three categories serve a useful purpose, depending upon the status of one's career. And, if you become a superstar, there may be a need to also employ a business manager and a publicist too. Let's take a look at all of these professional services.


The Difference Between Agents, Personal Managers, Entertainment Attorneys, Business Managers, and Publicists

The most successful writers, producers, and directors are usually represented by a primary agent, a personal manager, an entertainment law firm, a business manager, and a publicist. When an artist is in demand there's usually a definite career need to secure the services of more than one professional representative. Someone has to field the offers, help to make the right career moves, search for new projects, negotiate and finalize agreements, keep the client's name in and out of the press, and monitor the flow of money. Often, it just doesn't make sense to employ one person to take on all these responsibilities on your behalf.

Most superstars are more comfortable knowing that they have a cohesive support system in place. That's why they will often opt to hire an agent, personal manager, an entertainment attorney, business manager, and a publicist. Assembling the right team can make the difference between sustaining a career or fading out into oblivion.

Page 2.

We realize, of course, that most of us will never achieve superstar status in our respective fields. However, it's still important to know the business of the business. It can spell the difference between being solvent or going broke.

Agents: How They Work

The major agencies such as CAA, ICM, and William Morris are full service agencies, which means that they are departmentalized to assist clients on various levels of representation including film, television, stage, music, literary and interactive media venues.

Superstars often crossover and need representation that will cover all of these areas. The major agencies and some of their competitors are geared to provide full service for their clients. Boutique agencies tend to specialize in certain areas such as literary, concerts and personal appearances, film composers, etc.

Agents are, by law, employers . Since they act as employment agencies, they are legally entitled to a ten percent commission for their services. Sometimes, agents will forego the standard ten percent commission fee in order to receive a more lucrative packaging fee.

For example, the packaging fee for a television movie is an upfront 3 percent commission and a backend commission of 3 percent. The agency must sign a packaging fee agreement with their client and the broadcast television or cable network. The total packaging fee is based on the licensing fee, which is the designated amount that the network agrees to allocate in order to fund, air, and rerun the movie.

Whenever an agent receives a packaging fee, the clients who are part of the package are not required to pay any agency commission. Most writers, producers, actors and stars who are represented by an agency that acts as a packager consider the packaging fee arrangement to be a financial incentive since they save not only ten percent of their standard agency commission fee, but also do not have to pay their agency commission for any profit participation, residuals or any other income that they receive from the movie.

How do Agents differ from Personal Managers?

Essentially, most agents tend to focus on the art of the deal. They simply don't have the time or the inclination to cultivate an artist's career.

Personal managers, on the other hand, tend to look more to the long term on behalf of their clients' careers.

(continued)


Page 3.




Next week we'll discuss the key differences between agents and personal managers and why both entities need to work in harmony as a team whenever they represent the same client.

Please keep in mind that even if you're fortunate enough to find the right agent and personal manager it's still going to be up to you to take an active part in all your career decisions.

Be open to taking risks. Don't allow anyone to make a final decision on your behalf. In the end, it's your career and you will rise or fall based on the risks that you take.


"Many risks fail because they were not taken in time. Too many risks are postponed until unnecessarily elaborate preparations are made...Don't sit back waiting for the perfect moment. It almost never comes."

-- David Viscott




How To Produce Movies for Television


"People who soar are those who refuse to sit back, sigh and wish things would change. They neither complain of their lot nor passively dream of some distant ship coming in. Rather, they visualize in their minds that they are not quitters; they will not allow life's circumstances to push them down and hold them under."

-- Charles R. Swindoll

To achieve success in the entertainment industry, it's important to maintain a positive mental attitude. Visualizing your goals will help to set the wheels in motion. That's the first step. But don't stop there. Actualize your goals. This will bring you to the next plateau. It's critical to take action.

Nobody does it alone. We all need to work in concert with other professionals in order to fully realize our goals.

Many people are confused about representation and have asked us which is best: to be represented by an agent, personal manager, or an entertainment attorney.

The answer is that all three categories serve a useful purpose, depending upon the status of one's career. And, if you become a superstar, there may be a need to also employ a business manager and a publicist too. Let's take a look at all of these professional services.


The Difference Between Agents, Personal Managers, Entertainment Attorneys, Business Managers, and Publicists

The most successful writers, producers, and directors are usually represented by a primary agent, a personal manager, an entertainment law firm, a business manager, and a publicist. When an artist is in demand there's usually a definite career need to secure the services of more than one professional representative. Someone has to field the offers, help to make the right career moves, search for new projects, negotiate and finalize agreements, keep the client's name in and out of the press, and monitor the flow of money. Often, it just doesn't make sense to employ one person to take on all these responsibilities on your behalf.

Most superstars are more comfortable knowing that they have a cohesive support system in place. That's why they will often opt to hire an agent, personal manager, an entertainment attorney, business manager, and a publicist. Assembling the right team can make the difference between sustaining a career or fading out into oblivion.




2.

We realize, of course, that most of us will never achieve superstar status in our respective fields. However, it's still important to know the business of the business.
It can spell the difference between being solvent or going broke.

Agents: How They Work

The major agencies such as CAA, ICM, and William Morris are full service agencies, which means that they are departmentalized to assist clients on various levels of representation including film, television, stage, music, literary and interactive media venues.

Superstars often crossover and need representation that will cover all of these areas. The major agencies and some of their competitors are geared to provide full service for their clients. Boutique agencies tend to specialize in certain areas such as literary, concerts and personal appearances, film composers, etc.

Agents are, by law, employers . Since they act as employment agencies, they are legally entitled to a ten percent commission for their services. Sometimes, agents will forego the standard ten percent commission fee in order to receive a more lucrative packaging fee.

For example, the packaging fee for a television movie is an upfront 3 percent commission and a backend commission of 3 percent. The agency must sign a packaging fee agreement with their client and the broadcast television or cable network. The total packaging fee is based on the licensing fee, which is the designated amount that the network agrees to allocate in order to fund, air, and rerun the movie.

Whenever an agent receives a packaging fee, the clients who are part of the package are not required to pay any agency commission. Most writers, producers, actors and stars who are represented by an agency that acts as a packager consider the packaging fee arrangement to be a financial incentive since they save not only ten percent of their standard agency commission fee, but also do not have to pay their agency commission for any profit participation, residuals or any other income that they receive from the movie.

How do Agents differ from Personal Managers?

Essentially, most agents tend to focus on the art of the deal. They simply don't have the time or the inclination to cultivate an artist's career.

Personal managers, on the other hand, tend to look more to the long term on behalf of their clients' careers.

(continued)


3.




Next week we'll discuss the key differences between agents and personal managers and why both entities need to work in harmony as a team whenever they represent the same client.

Please keep in mind that even if you're fortunate enough to find the right agent and personal manager it's still going to be up to you to take an active part in all your career decisions.

Be open to taking risks. Don't allow anyone to make a final decision on your behalf. In the end, it's your career and you will rise or fall based on the risks that you take.


"Many risks fail because they were not taken in time. Too many risks are postponed until unnecessarily elaborate preparations are made...Don't sit back waiting for the perfect moment. It almost never comes."

-- David Viscott















2.


Agents: How They Work

The major agencies such as CAA, ICM, and William Morris are full service agencies, which means that they are departmentalized to assist clients on various levels of representation including film, television, stage, music, literary and interactive media venues.

Superstars often need representation that will cover all of these areas. The major agencies and some of their competitors are geared to provide full service for their clients. Boutique agencies tend to specialize in certain areas such as literary, concerts and personal appearances, film composers, etc.

Most agents are, by law, employers. They are entitled to a ten percent commission for their services. Sometimes, agents will forego the standard ten percent commision fee in order to receive a more lucrative packaging fee. For example, the packaging fee for a television movie is a 3 percent commission upfront and a backend commission of 3 percent which is based on the total budget of the licensing fee which is sanctioned by the broadcast network or cable network which will air the movie.

Whenever an agent receives a packaging fee, the clients who are part of the package are not required to pay any commission. Many writers, producers, actors and stars who are part of such a packaging fee arrangement consider this to be an incentive.

Agents tend to focus on the art of the deal. Personal managers look more to the long term.

Pesonal Managers: How They Differ from Agents
















2.


Agents: How They Work

The major agencies such as CAA, ICM, and William Morris are full service agencies, which means that they are departmentalized to assist clients on various levels of representation including film, television, stage, music, literary and interactive media venues.

Superstars often need representation that will cover all of these areas. The major agencies and some of their competitors are geared to provide full service for their clients. Boutique agencies tend to specialize in certain areas such as literary, concerts and personal appearances, film composers, etc.

Most agents are, by law, employers. They are entitled to a ten percent commission for their services. Sometimes, agents will forego the standard ten percent commision fee in order to receive a more lucrative packaging fee. For example, the packaging fee for a television movie is a 3 percent commission upfront and a backend commission of 3 percent which is based on the total budget of the licensing fee which is sanctioned by the broadcast network or cable network which will air the movie.

Whenever an agent receives a packaging fee, the clients who are part of the package are not required to pay any commission. Many writers, producers, actors and stars who are part of such a packaging fee arrangement consider this to be an incentive.

Agents tend to focus on the art of the deal. Personal managers look more to the long term.

Pesonal Managers: How They Differ from Agents





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